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Dave FleischerNow You're Talking (1927)

something has gone horribly wrong 8-p
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An instructional film for the telephone using a combination of animation and live action. Produced by Max and Dave Fleischer.

Copied at 24fps from a 35mm print preserved by the Library of Congress, drawing from material from the AFI/Donald Nicol and AFI/Ahti Pataja Collections.


This movie is part of the collection: Animation Shorts

Director: Dave Fleischer
Sponsor: Inkwell Studios
Audio/Visual: silent, black & white
Keywords: animation; telephone; instructional

Creative Commons license: Public Domain


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Now You're Talking 298.6 MB 
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Now You're Talking 188.6 KB 
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Reviews
Average Rating: 4.75 out of 5 stars4.75 out of 5 stars4.75 out of 5 stars4.75 out of 5 stars4.75 out of 5 stars

Reviewer: Pixieguts - 5.00 out of 5 stars5.00 out of 5 stars5.00 out of 5 stars5.00 out of 5 stars5.00 out of 5 stars - January 11, 2014
Subject: Excellent!
Playful delight.

Reviewer: The_Emperor_Of_Television - 5.00 out of 5 stars5.00 out of 5 stars5.00 out of 5 stars5.00 out of 5 stars5.00 out of 5 stars - January 16, 2012
Subject: Happy Talking Talking Happy Talk
Surprisingly entertaining cartoon short.

It's timeless and dated at the same time, which is always a plus.

Never before has a telephone been such a sympathetic character.

Reviewer: randomc - 5.00 out of 5 stars5.00 out of 5 stars5.00 out of 5 stars5.00 out of 5 stars5.00 out of 5 stars - September 11, 2005
Subject: Max Fleischer is a god...
I really love Fleischer cartoons. The inspired goofiness really appeals to me. Maybe I should worry about that...

I can't wait for robotics to advance to the point where we can have Fleischer-inspired ambulatory furnishings. I also wish my beard could be prehensile like the doctor's. Now that would be handy!

I was startled (but upon thinking about it, not particularly surprised) to find that they were selling pointless phone accessories since day one. Sheesh.

Remember kids: Be nice to your phone, and a pretty nurse will let you have a baby boy - now you're talking!

Reviewer: Wilford B. Wolf - 4.00 out of 5 stars4.00 out of 5 stars4.00 out of 5 stars4.00 out of 5 stars - July 21, 2005
Subject: Now You're Talking!
Beautifully preserved silent advertising film from Max Fleischer. The film starts off with a man trying to talk into a phone while trying to smoke a cigar. After failing to hear clearly (clearly failing to grasp how to use a phone), the man falls asleep.

His dream is done in the classic 1920's Fleischer style, using word balloons when characters needs to speak. The film relies on simple black and white lines, much like his later sound film "Finding His Voice".

A anthropomorphic phone is rushed into the hospital. When the doctor examines him, the phone complains of fatigue and the doctor examines the phone's diary. The diary covers all the don't of the day; don't get the cord wet, don't tangle the cord, look up correct number when speaking with the operator, etc. It should be noted that the film does contain a stereotypical portrayal of a African American zookeeper, complete with stereotypical speech.

After the rules are covered, the man wakes up, remembers the rules and is able to hear what's going on. The print for this film is in excellent condition and a fine example of Fleischer's style of the period.